September 23, 2016

A Surprise Make Your Own Sale! And Craftsy Sale, too!



20% off all products, including kits and fabric-by-the-yard

Visit our website and treat yourself to something on your wish list or some of the tools Marti uses in her Craftsy classes!

The sale ends at midnight on Sunday September 25, 2016, no matter where you live. So, regardless of what time zone you are in, you can save money on our quilting products.

Use the 20% off coupon when you check out -- it's good on everything in our store!

Our usual flat rate of $5.95 shipping and handling for domestic orders (actual postage for orders delivered outside the continental USA) will be applied.

Craftsy is having a surprise sale, too!
ALL Craftsy classes are under $20 this weekend!



This is the perfect time to add my Craftsy classes and any others on your wish list to your Craftsy library – buy now and watch them any time you want, as many times as you like! Sign up for classes here.


If you have ever tried to join quilted blocks or sections and been disappointed because the seams are bulky, you will see some wonderful "bulk busting" techniques that I have developed using the 1-inch Marti's Choice Fusible Tape (product #8221 or #8272).

Limited instructions are included in the class notes for these specific blocks and do reference the From Marti Michell tools that were used to cut them:

Log Cabin (Ruler #8038, 1 and 2 inch finished strip widths)

Courthouse Steps (Log Cabin Ruler #8037, 1-1/2 and 3/4 inch finished strip widths)

Ohio Star (Template Set A #8251 and the Small Diagonal Set Triangle Ruler #8967)

Virginia Reel (Set A #8251)


Watch a video preview of Better, Faster Log Cabins and sign up by clicking here. 

This class presents in video format three of the most popular Log Cabin Quilts in my book Log Cabin ABCs : the Classic Log Cabin, the Fat quarter Log Cabin and introduces off-center Log Cabin blocks. The From Marti Michell Log Cabin Rulers are not required to benefit from the class, they just make it easier to be accurate.


While you're on our site, be sure to check out our newest products and tools for cutting classic designs that are on your bucket list, like Double Wedding Ring and Giant Dahlia.


Starry Path
#8586


Multi-size template set makes
6, 9 and 10 inch blocks. Includes instructions to make this quilt.







Kite and Crown in 2 sizes
#8287, 2 inch
#8288, 3 inch






Multi-Size Fussy Cutter
#8297

It is so much fun to fussy cut and emphasize motifs that help tell the story or create a new design. The detailed lines in a regular ruler can be confusing. Besides you have to “do the math” to know where the center is or trust your “eyeball” measurements. You may not know when you will need it, but it is easy to see that the Fussy Cutter is “too handy not to have it on hand
 
60-degree Corner Trimmer #8298

The 60° Corner Trimmer is handy for cutting off the dog ears on ruler-cut equilateral triangles plus other shapes in the 60° family. BONUS: You can also use it to cut 5 sizes of equilateral triangles, and it's perfect for A Thousand Pyramids quilts.
More Bang for the Buck! #8352

If you own Set A, B, C, D, E, Strippers, Set L, M, N, O, P Q, R, S, T, Storm at Sea Diamond Template Set and/or the From Marti Michell Flying Geese Ruler, More Bang for the Buck! will help you get more bang for your bucks! Inside this book, you will learn -
• More ways to use Perfect Patchwork Templates
• Ways to convert ruler-cutting instructions to template cutting
• Rotary cutting tips – template rotary cutting tips!
• Why and how to cut strips the Marti Way
• Ways to use templates to cut shapes that have no template
• Tips for cutting connector blocks -- and more!





Giant Dahlia Template Set #8949
with detailed instruction booklet


Regularly $50

20% coupon saves $10 = on sale for $40!



 






Double Wedding Ring Template Set #8017
with detailed instruction booklet

Regularly $38
On sale $30.40!






Thank you for using our products and believing in them.

September 19, 2016

Chart 69: Carolina, Block #19 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along



Carolina must hold the record for the number of different shapes in one quilt block. It is very unusual to find 60-degree equilateral triangles (19H), Spike triangles (19D), right triangles (19C), a square (19B), rectangles (19A), kites (19G), and a couple of mirror image irregular triangles (19E and 19F) that I can’t identify, all in one block!

Have you read the letter on page 74 associated with the Carolina block? It is so-so-so true! "Things weren't what they used to be." Isn’t it interesting how that message can be applied so easily to the quilt world, too? So, while Carolina is more template-friendly than it looks, it is also quite easy to cut the non-template friendly pieces using the paper patterns and small rulers.

Interestingly, we have a brand new 60-degree corner trimmer that is an equilateral triangle complete with our engineered corners. It also has markings for cutting triangles that will have 1-1/2 inch finished edges just like the eight #19H triangles needed for this block. If you have one of our new corner trimmers, you could use it to cut the 19H triangles.



The corner trimmer is also a great One-derful One Patch template. It's perfect for cutting 1- to 3-inch 60-degree triangles in 1/2-inch increments, and for eliminating dog ears on ruler-cut equilateral triangles, too.


I’m not suggesting that you buy the 60° Corner Trimmer to make this one block, but if you keep a From Marti Michell Wish List (and we hope you do!), you might want to list the 60° Corner Trimmer, Product #8298, $5 USD.

We used Spike from the Multi Size Peaky & Spike template set to cut 19D. Don't forget to trim the corenrs at the bottom of Spike.


My Carolina Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Carolina:

Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Carolina block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://sweetlittlepretties.com/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.



September 12, 2016

Chart 68: Bride, Block 17 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


Mini Fresh Cuts 
34 inches square, made by Faye Heyn


The Bride block is very template–friendly if you own From Marti Michell Template Set E, Product #8255 and the Multi-size Kite Ruler, #8158. That being the case, we can’t help but put in a plug for owning those very versatile tools.



Set E is the basic set for making 6- and 12-inch quilt blocks that feature the 8-pointed stars made with 45° diamonds. It is a great opportunity to show off your skills with set-in seams. Pair Set E with Volume 3 of the Encyclopedia of Patchwork Blocks, Product #8345. We think Volume 3 has the best collection available of blocks using 45° diamonds. There are 55 block designs—some in as many as 3 sizes!

Volume 3 by Marti Michell

While Volume 3 includes the Bride's Bouquet block (the classic name for this block), it's actually the Kite Ruler booklet that includes the most complete instructions for making Bride's Bouquet in 3 sizes. The booklet that comes with the Multi-Size Kite Ruler also has instructions for six other classic blocks, which you can see on the package cover above. There are 2 designs that pair with Set E and 2 with the Kaleido-Ruler, all in multiple sizes.

And if you really love the Bride's Bouquet block and making miniature quilts, you'll love the second page of the PDF that you can download below. It includes paper patterns of our template shapes, the swag pattern and yardage for the mini quilt featuring 9 darling 6-inch blocks that is shown at the beginning of this article. 

My Bride Block

This block is made with our Template Set E and the Multi-size Kite Ruler. 

Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Bride and the Bonus Mini Fresh Cuts:

Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Bride block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://kidgiddy.blogspot.com/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.


September 5, 2016

Chart 67: Alice, Block 3 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


Before you start, make sure that you have the author's corrections file, which you can download from  Gnome Angel's blog about halfway down on the Sew Along FAQs page. However, you don't need the correction to make the block with our tools and techniques.


Alice is another 6-inch block designed on this popular diagonal set grid. Regardless of how you piece, all of the sub-units can be confirmed or perfected with Set A templates A-3, A-4 and A-6.


If a 6-inch block has 53 pieces, there is a good chance some of them are microscopic – my definition of a microscopic quilt piece is that there is more square area in the seam allowances than in the finished shape.

The bottom line is that we chose to simplify the microscopic triangles 3B and 3D by cutting squares instead. Then the squares can be folded and sewn in place (3B) to replace triangles or sewn into a bigger unit that is cut down (3D). 


The best part is that these 2 changes have resulted in eliminating all of the mirror-image pointed 3E, 3F, 3G, 3H, 3L, and 3M pieces and replacing them with nice even strips.

But, I digress even with these simplifications, you still don’t have time to read more! Alice beckons!

My Alice Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Alice:

Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Alice block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://www.downgrapevinelane.com/

Speaking of Down Grapevine Lane

One of my favorite things about going to Quilt Market is the chance to meet someone in person who I know only from working with them online or via telephone or email. In May, I met Sedef Imer, who is one of our Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along bloggers. Sedef had traveled from Australia to Salt Lake City, Utah, for the introduction of her new fabric line with Riley Blake, and one of the things I was doing there was showing my new line with Maywood Studios. We were happy to share a hug and a chatty hello!








The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.

August 29, 2016

Chart 66: Ruby, Block #89 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


Ruby is a 6-inch version of one of my favorite string-pieced scrap quilt blocks. Without the string-piecing, the block is called Periwinkle…so with string-piecing, we cleverly call these blocks String-pieced Periwinkle. 😊

The blocks in the 16 x 44 inch (40.6 x 111.8 cm) table runner below are 14 inches.


We used the full size on the From Marti Michell #8105 No-Flip Diagonal Set Triangle Ruler to cut 12 foundation fabric triangles for the 3 blocks.  In the instructions for Ruby, the foundation fabric was exposed and became the star in the center. However, it is more common to completely cover the foundation fabric so you can use fabric you want to get rid of for the foundation. It stays in the project.


Then the FMM #8105 Kite is used to cut the kite shapes. It is a multi-sized tool and for this table runner the “Large” size was used. Place the separate kite shape in the center of the foundation fabric.

I like to make the first string-piecing strips from the same fabric and cut the same width so they nicely outline the star when the four triangles are joined.




It is fun to use mirrors to get a good idea of the completed look. (Shown are the 11-inch hinged mirrors, #30084. Also available in 6-inch size, #8941.)



Have you been saving selvages thinking you would find just the right project? Why not try a String-pieced Periwinkle pillow or quilt?

My Ruby Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Ruby:

Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Ruby block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://intheboondocks.blogspot.com/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.

August 22, 2016

Chart #65: Mrs. Taft, Block #73 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


In some parts of the world, today is my birthday, so… I'm taking the day off!  😊 

However, I can't help but remind you that if you are using Laurie's layout for your finished quilt, you will need 8 half blocks for the top and bottom for 4 of the rows. This is easiest to do by making a block with a center diagonal seam, like Mrs. Taft, and leaving it in two halves. That means you will still have the proper 1/4-inch seam allowances.

My Mrs. Taft Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Mrs. Taft:

Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the April block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://betteroffthread.com/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.



August 15, 2016

Chart 64: Magnolia, Block #54 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


Magnolia from Another Angle

A cheap Kaleidoscope was one of my favorite toys as a child and I’m still fascinated with watching the changing images through a Kaleidoscope. In fact, I see 5 Kaleidoscopes on my desk and 4 more on a nearby bookshelf.

One of my early blogs “Arizona in February (Feb. 24, 2009) details my enjoyment of visiting the largest Kaleidoscope store in the world – Nellie Bly in Jerome, AZ.

All of that background information was just so I can tell you that when I show the From Marti Michell Magic Mirrors, I almost always say, “and when you don’t even feel like sewing, you can just get out the mirrors and look at your fabric like a kaleidoscope!” Typically I then show the mirrors held at either a 60° or 45° angle and reflecting fabric motifs like a kaleidoscope.

We have two mirrors available (click to go to our web store):


I have mentioned before that sometimes being in a sampler quilt does not do a block justice. Some block designs are more interesting set edge to edge for example or rotated. I felt like Magnolia might be more interesting as one quarter of a 12” block. So I got out the mirror set to look – this time with a 90° angle on one corner of the block. What do you think? View 1:


With the magnolia buds pointing outward, we might call it Magnolia Corners. Four pairs of Peaky shapes would combine to make four traditional Peaky and Spike sub-units.

Or do you prefer View 2? Here I’ve added a dark corner square and it and the dark Peaky shapes form a rounded shape – we might call this new block the Magnolia Showcase:


Meanwhile, I hope you will enjoy making Magnolia.

My Magnolia Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Magnolia:
Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Starlight block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://www.aquiltinglife.com/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.

August 8, 2016

Chart 63: Starlight, Block #93 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


Within a few days of making the Starlight block, I was selecting several of our antique and/or vintage quilts to share at a regional American Quilt Study Group meeting. Crib quilts are more difficult to acquire, but much easier to pack and display so I was taking all that we own.

It is always fun to show this 1930s crib quilt. Normally the size of the blocks in a crib quilt are reduced to be more appropriate to the scale of the quilt, so it is very unusual for a crib quilt to feature 12-inch blocks like these.



I can’t help but wonder why? Were these blocks intended for a full-size bed sampler and the maker got tired of making sampler blocks? Or were the blocks inherited and the new owner felt obligated to finish something? Or did the maker need a baby-gift in a hurry and just used some big blocks she had?

While I clearly remember the crib quilt and the 12-inch blocks, I have to admit that from memory I could not have named one of the block designs. However, as soon as I opened the quilt I spotted the Starlight block. There are four pale green squares that are so badly faded out it is easy to miss the design, so here is a close-up.


Now, here is my 6-inch block for the 1930’s Farmer’s Wife Sampler.

My Starlight Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Starlight:
Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Starlight block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://www.blog.tiedwitharibbon.com/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.



August 1, 2016

Chart 62: Carol, Block #18 in the Farmer's Wife 1930s Sew Along


If you own Set C of the Perfect Patchwork Templates, you can use C-15 to cut the large square-on-point in Carol. Many of you also made the 1920s Farmer’s Wife Sampler blocks and the Set C pieces were used more frequently in that book than in this one.


If you have not done the 1920s blocks, you may not know that we have also done template conversions for those blocks. Every 3 or 4 months we start a new email program with those conversions. You receive a template conversion chart for 10 blocks via email every 2 weeks. The blocks are also organized by common template sets or techniques as in this quilt. We just started mailing those PDFs out a few weeks ago, so there is still time to sign up on our website at http://www.frommarti.com/  Here's what to look for on the left side of the page:


You can also sign up through our company Facebook page. That button is also on the left side of the page (you may have to scroll down). Click on the bird holding the envelope to open the signup window (you can get to our Pinterest and YouTube Channel from the same area):


Please share this info with your friends.

Comparing Sets A and B

Sets A and B contain the most frequently used pieces in basic patchwork. 12-inch or approximately 30 cm blocks are the most popular finished sizes, and 3 x 3 or 4 x 4 grid designs are also the most common.


The pieces in Sets A and B are exactly the same 7 shapes, just different sizes. Set A pieces are components of a 3-inch square and Set B of a 4-inch square. We like to say, “Anything you can make with Set A, you can make with Set B, it will just be bigger.’’


Volume 1 of the Encyclopedia of Patchwork Blocks features 69 patchwork block designs. You can make most in 3 sizes each with Sets A and B.


For example (from the Vol. 1 Block Index on our website):


Comparing Sets C and D

Sets C and D are companion sets for Sets A and B. They contain components of 3-inch and 4-inch squares that are not used quite as frequently as those in Sets A and B. Most of the shapes are the same, but in Set C we included C-15, a square that sits on point in a 6-inch square, the equivalent of 4 3-inch squares. Set D, on the other hand, includes the Square Within a Square components for a 2-inch finished unit made with the D-28 square on point plus triangle D-29 to make the corners, the latter being a combination you have used frequently in the 1930s Farmer’s Wife Sampler blocks.


You can see more blocks that use Sets A and C or B and D in the block index on our website for Volume 2 of the Encyclopedia of Patchwork Blocks. 



My Carol Block


Click on the image for a larger view. Click the link below to download the Chart for cutting and making Carol:
Visit these other Farmer's Wife Sew Along blogs, too, for sewing tutorials and other info about the Starlight block:

http://gnomeangel.com

http://www.sunflowerstitcheries.com/sunflower-quilting-blog/






The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt: Inspiring Letters from Farm Women of the Great Depression and 99 Quilt Blocks That Honor Them by Laurie Aaron Hird for Fons & Porter/F+W.